About the Authors

Professor Sonya G. BonneauSonya G. Bonneau

Professor of Legal Research and Writing
Georgetown University Law Center

B.A., Cornell; J.D., University of California, Berkeley

Professor Bonneau was an attorney at Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, in its Manhattan office, and subsequently a partner at Hancock & Estabrook, LLP. Her practice areas included appellate practice and procedure, commercial litigation, employment discrimination, and antitrust law. Professor Bonneau was a law clerk for Hon. Norman A. Mordue at the United States District Court of the Northern District of New York. Before coming to Georgetown, Professor Bonneau was a legal writing professor at the Syracuse University College of Law.

Professor Susan A. McMahonSusan A. McMahon

Professor of Legal Research and Writing
University of California, Irvine School of Law

B.A., College of the Holy Cross; J.D., Georgetown

Prof. McMahon's scholarly work centers on lawyering and legal education, with a particular focus on how lawyers can drive change within legal systems. Her work has been published in outlets such as the Minnesota Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, and Virginia Law Review Online. Before joining the faculty at UC Irvine School of Law, she taught at the Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law and Georgetown University Law Center. She practiced at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP and clerked for the Honorable Richard J. Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Prof. McMahon’s scholarly work is widely recognized and centers on lawyering and legal education, with a particular focus on how lawyers can drive change within legal systems. She is also an expert on the intersection of mental disability and the criminal system, and she has written on topics such as competence restoration, involuntary medication, and stigma against individuals with mental illness.  Her scholarly work has found a home in journals such as the Minnesota Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, American Criminal Law Review, and University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law and Public Affairs. Her most recent scholarship includes the article, “What We Teach When We Teach Legal Analysis,” 107 Minn. L. Rev. 2511 (2023), which won the Legal Writing Institute’s 2024 Teresa Godwin Phelps Award for Scholarship in Legal Communication.